The Science behind “Exercise is LIKE Medicine” - How exercise can effect chronic diseases

Posted October 05, 2020 By Remote Training Systems
The Science behind  “Exercise is LIKE Medicine” - How exercise can effect chronic diseases

The Role of Exercise and its effect on Metabolic Syndrome

The information included in this presentation is taken from the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports:

  • Evidence now suggests that in selected cases exercise therapy is just as effective as medical treatment. And, in special situations, more effective.
  • In this context, exercise therapy does not represent a paradigm change – it is rather that the accumulated knowledge is now so extensive that it has to be implemented.
  • Exercise therapy can have clinical effects, either by directly affecting the disease pathogenesis (e.g. intermittent claudication, coronary heart disease) by improving dominant symptoms of the underlying disease (e.g. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) or by enhancing physical fitness, strength, and hence the quality of life in patients weakened by disease (e.g. cancer). 

 

*The effects of exercise on the prevention of diabetes:

Six-year clinical study of 577 participants with impaired glucose tolerance:

Group 1: Diet Alone – the risk of diabetes reduced by 31%

Group 2: Exercise Alone – the risk of diabetes reduced by 46%

Group 3: Exercise and Diet – the risk of diabetes reduced by 42%

 

*Clinical Study of the effect on mortality rate:

Twelve-year study of 6956 men aged 48 years

  • Health screening identified those with impaired glucose tolerance and those with normal tolerance.
  • Group broken into three groups: (1) diet/exercise, (2) routine treatment, (3) normal tolerance participants

Findings:

  • The mortality rate for the intervention group was the same as the normal tolerance group (6.5% v., 6.2%)
  • The mortality rate for the intervention group was lower than the routine treatment group (6.5% vs. 14%)

 

The Takeaway:

  • Move more, with more intensity, and sit less.
  • Science has linked being inactive and sitting too much with a higher risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, colon and lung cancers, and early death.
  • It’s clear that being more active benefits everyone and helps us live longer, healthier lives.